La Mort du duc de Guise

August 25, 2009

Music notes

Alhambra Theatre , London

‘At a “private exhibition” yesterday afternoon, Messers. Pathe Freres, in conjunction with the management, showed on the cinematograph  three wordless plays from Paris.’

‘On the cinematograph we saw not only the murder …but glimpses of the life of cafes , grand and humble …and all sorts of thrilling things, including a  danse d’Apache by Mlle. Mistenguette and a man.’

‘All these, of course,  not in the flesh, but on the films , while the orchestra played….next came a version of  L’Arlesienne… and finally the Murder of the Duke of Guise, a play specially composed for  this kind of performance , by M. Lavenden, and acted by no lesser people than M. le Bargey, M. Albert Lambert, and Mlle. Gabrielle Robbinne.’  The Times, Saturday, Nov 21, 1908; pg. 13; Issue 38810; col

Camille Saint-Saens wrote in 1908 the first modern film score for the cinema, for the silent film Murder of the Duke of Guise [sometimes refered to as  L’Assassinat du duc de Guise].    The film only ran for about 18 minutes, but has become of great historical importance in the development of silent films, film scores, and sound of  the ‘talkies’.  Silent films were still popular in France up to the 1930s.

It is interesting to note that as the film achieved critical acclaim, going some way of launching the fledgeling film industry into popular culture, Saint-Saëns did not himself seek the notariety associated with later film-stars and film score composers.   Saint-Saëns wrote to the German journalist M. Levin in 1901  “I take very little notice of either praise or censure, not because I have an exalted idea of my own merits (which would be foolish), but because in doing my work, and fulfilling the function of my nature, as an apple-tree grows apples, I have no need to trouble myself with other people’s views.”

The Union of Film Music Composers [UFMC] is celebrating the centenary of film music, in association with the Federation of Film and Audiovisual Composers of Europe [FFACE].  UFMC writes that   ‘Le film marque un tournant dans l’histoire du cinéma en édifiant d’une première pierre l’histoire de la musique originale : la composition de Saint-Saëns suit très précisément chaque scène, n’autorisant au chef aucune désynchronisation avec l’image. D’autres extraits de musiques de films ainsi qu’une masterclass suivront la projection.’

 If you would like to lean more about Saint-Saëns and early film music, please see the links below….

Musical memories by Camille Saint-Saëns

French cinema : from its beginnings to the present by Rémi Fournier Lanzoni  shelved on L evel 2 at 791.430944/LAN

The sounds of early cinema /edited by Richard Abel and Rick Altman  shelved on Level 2 at 791.4309/SOU

Spellbound in darkness :a history of the silent film by George C. Pratt shelved on Level 2 at 791.4309/PRA

The ciné goes to town :French cinema, 1896-1914 /Richard Abel shelved on Level 2 at 791.430944/ABE

Musicians of To-Day, by Romain Rolland [1915]

Film and Sound Online – a set of collections of film and video. Login via UK Federation, choose Loughborough University (ATHENS) from the drop-down list then login with your Athens username and password.   Available via MetaLib.

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Sea of Tranquillity

July 21, 2009

 

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 Apollo 40th Anniversary

 

 ‘Apollo 11 makes its thunderous, fiery exit at tea time on July 16th with its three man crew: Mr. Neil Armstrong, a civilian who is destined to be the first on the moon, Lieutenant-Colonel Edwin Aldrin, who will walk the surface with him, and Lieutenant-Colonel Michael Collins who will stay in the orbiting command module………Perhaps the greatest prize awaited from the journey is the 50lb. of lunar rock and soil the astronauts are expected to gather ……… ‘The Times Tuesday, Jun 03, 1969; pg. III; Issue 57576; col A

The lunar rock samples brought by the Apollo missions show us that the moon contains familiar material such as iron, aluminium, potassium, magnesium, feldspar, basalt, ranging in form from fine dust to rugged rocks and boulders.  

Samples were distributed to a selection of  scientific institutions throughout the world,  and lunar rock samples went on public display at the Museum and Institute of Geological Sciences, London, in September 1969 [Edinburgh University’s sample is said to have ‘arrived in a tiny phial wrapped in a pair of pyjamas …. Five grams of  greyish brown dust … estimated to be worth more than £1m.’   The Times Saturday, Sep 20, 1969; pg. 1; Issue 57670; col A]

Loughborough University subscribes to over 40 aeronautical and astronolical journals online, such as Acta astronauticaAstronomy & geophysicsAstrophysics and Space Science  and Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy , all of which can be accessed via MetaLib.   [ATHENS username and password required for off campus access]

Image collections are available also in MetaLib, giving a wide range of pictures of the moon, footage from  NASA space missions, interviews with former astronauts, audio tracks of the moon landings, – for audio visual material you can use  Newsfilm online  [ some 3,000 hours of footage; c. 60,000 stories] and  BBC Motion Gallery [which contains over 30,000 clips are available, spanning 70 years].   [ATHENS username and password required for access].

If you would like to learn more about the Apollo missions, please see the links below.

Google Moon

Film of Apollo 11

Audio Apollo 11 landing

NASA – Celebrating the ‘giant leap’

Department of Aeronautical and Automotive Engineering at Loughborough University.

Department of Geography at Loughborough University


Cricket at Loughborough

July 7, 2009

 

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‘On Wednesday an interesting game was played in Mr Tyler’s meadow, near the railway, between eleven of the Loughborough’s Gentlemen’s Club, and the Borough-hill Club.   At the close of the game, which was played first-rate, the number of runs stood as follows:  Loughborough 192, Borough Hill 92, majority, 100.‘  The Era (London, England), Sunday, August 13, 1843; Issue 255

Loughborough has a long cricket history.  Tyler’s meadow is believed to be a ground  near Allsops Lane, where Loughborough played an annual match against the All England Eleven and the United England Eleven from 1856 – 1871.

Loughborough has had, over time, up to 12 cricket grounds, such as the Park Road ground which was first used in 1913, and the College Ground, where Leicestershire came to play Galmorgan in 1929.  The first ever County Cricket match between Leicester and Nottingham was played in Loughborough in 1781, although the location of this early pitch is unknown.

Loughborough University Library has over 200 books on cricket, ranging from historic works such as W.G. Grace’s Cricket, published in 1891 and housed in the Special Collections alongside books on cricket by Douglas Jardine, C.B. Fry, Walter Hammond, Pelham Warner, Neville Cardus and Donald Bradman,  to modern coaching and training manuals.

You can also  find out more about cricket via sports databases available on through MetaLib, such as SPORTDiscus which can be searched for full-text articles on physical fitness, exercise, sports medicine, sports science, physical education, kinesiology, coaching, training etc.

If you would like to find out more about modern cricket at Loughborough, please see the links below.

Loughborough UCCE (University Cricket Centre of Excellence)

National Cricket Performance Centre

Loughborough School of Sport and Exercise Sciences

Loughborough School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Loughborough Outwoods Cricket Club

Loughborough Greenfields Cricket Club 

Loughborough Carillon Cricket Club

Loughborough Town Cricket Club


BBC to launch political webcasting service

June 23, 2009

The indetail09 industrial design degree show 2009

June 9, 2009

 

indetail

June 12th – 19th 2009

The indetail09 industrial design degree show is a collection of undergraduate work from Loughborough University’s Design and Technology department.

This year’s event will be held at the Sir Denis Rooke Building in Holywell Park, Loughborough and will showcase over 100 student projects.

Admission is free and there is no need to book in advance.

We look forward to meeting you!

Opening Times


Friday       12th June        12pm – 5pm
Saturday  13th June        10am – 5pm
Sunday     14th June       10am – 5pm
Monday   15th June       10am – 5pm
Tuesday   16th June      10am – 12pm

The indetail09 industrial design degree show


Rock’s Backpages

June 3, 2009

 

Guitar2 Loughborough University Library now subscribes to the new database Rock’s Backpages.

Rock’s Backpages is an online database of rock music writing, with material dating from the late 1950’s to the present day.

The library of articles includes reviews, interviews and features, which are fully searchable and presented in full-text.

The database also includes Mp3 audio files of original artist interviews, which are available for the first time.

There are now over fourteen thousand articles on the site, featuring over two thousand artists with up to fifty new articles added each week.

You can access the database from on-campus via MetaLib

For off-campus access please login to the Library pages via the Remote Working Portal .

Loughborough University Department of Social Sciences.

Loughborough University Department of Politics, International Relations and European Studies

 


BBC to launch political webcasting service : Democracy Live

May 11, 2009
Motorway sign on M6 7/7/2005. Copyright David Wulff www.flickr.com
Motorway sign on M6 7/7/2005. Copyright David Wulff http://www.flickr.com

The above photograph was taken on July 7th 2005, the day when the London tube bombings took place. On this date the BBC received a thousand stills and videos, 3,000 texts and 20,000 e-mails. According to the director of BBC News, Helen Boaden, this was the day that news gathering in Britain changed forever – ‘it introduced citizen journalism on an unprecedented scale fuelled by the use of mobile camera and video phones’.

In response to the growth in this new kind of  journalism the BBC is to launch a political webcasting platform in the autumn known as ‘Democracy Live’ . The site will offer ‘live and on-demand video from all the main UK institutions and the European Parliament’. Users will be able to search the site for video footage of officials and the topics that are of interest to them.
They will be then be able to follow the contributions of elected representatives in the various parliaments and find out more about their backgrounds.
As well as providing an important resource for current affairs, the site will also include information on the workings of the institutions of the UK government and their powers .
The aim is to make ‘Democracy Live’ a resource that is to be shared with its users who will be able download video and text content and place it on their own blogs and sites.