CAMIO: Catalog of Art Museum Images Online

July 28, 2009

 

 

painting

Camio is a new picture resource available via MetaLib.

Camio is a premier resource of high-quality art images from around the world contributed and described by leading museums, all rights-cleared for educational use.

Every work in CAMIO is represented by at least one high-resolution image and a description. Many have additional views of the work, sound, video and curatorial notes.

Terms of Use

Please note:  Any Work (or part thereof) that is downloaded and/or copied into print, digital, or any other media shall include the proper attribution, including but not limited to any copyright notice, as shown for the Work when it is displayed through CAMIO, as well as the database copyright notice “CAMIO.© OCLC”. ……No Work (or any part thereof) may be incorporated into any Web site that is accessible to anyone other than Authorized Users.’

Access is direct from on-campus via MetaLib.    For off-campus access please login to the Library pages via the Remote Working Portal

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Loughborough helping to create People’s Record

July 27, 2009
Library Centenary Open Day stands

People’s Record Project Stand

Loughborough University Library is one of only two academic libraries to take part in the People’s Record, an archival strand of the Museums, Libraries and Archives Council’s (MLA) ‘Setting the Pace’ programme which marks the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

The University Library helped collate the stories of the University’s students and staff, as well as the wider local community in an attempt to capture the ‘Olympic’ mood.  Further details of Loughborough’s involvement in the People’s Record project is available at PODIUM, the Further and Higher Education Unit for the 2012 Games.

If you are interested in discovering more about pople’s atitude towards sport and the Olympics why not do a keyword search on SportsDiscus and Nexis UK.


New APA 6th edition output style in RefWorks

July 27, 2009

When RefWorks users who use the APA style login to complete a bibliography, it is now possible to use the latest, 6th edition. To do so, Click on the tab marked Bibliography and next to the drop-down menu marked Output Style select Output Style Manager. Select APA 6th edition and Add to Favorites. Please beware, though! RefWorks – as you can see from the message below – are still working on a few details:

“APA 6th style is not a major change from APA 5th output style. The new version does not use the database name with the exception of ERIC documents (reports). We have removed the database field from all reference types with the exception of reports. The new edition of APA has changed the manner in which authors are to be listed in the text and in the reference list. The new reference list guidelines state that when there are seven or more authors there should only be seven authors presented. When there are more than seven authors the first six are to be listed, ellipses added after the sixth, and the last author added at the end. In order for RefWorks to adhere to these changes, we will need to make modifications to our current Output Style Editor which will require program development. In the short-term, our new APA style will list all authors and will require the user to manually remove the extra authors and add the ellipses.

The new guidelines allow for the inclusion of up to five authors in the first instance of an in-text citation and the use of the first author with ‘et al.’ in all subsequent citations of the same reference. This too, will require APA specific development in RefWorks.”

If you have any comments please pass them on to the RefWorks administrator for Loughborough who is Frank Parry at f.parry@lboro.ac.uk


Defra – making the most of packaging

July 22, 2009

 

Snowfall Before 2009 - Photo by Steve Keys

 Snowfall before 2009   –  photo Steve Keys

Defra has published  a new strategy for managing waste packaging: New Packaging Strategy, Making the most of packaging,

Defra writes that the new publication ‘ outlines packaging policy’s direction for the next decade. The Strategy’s overall aim is to minimise the environmental impact of packaging, without compromising its ability to protect the product and also sets out plans to improve the recycling of packaging waste.’

‘In 2008 the UK disposed of an estimated 10.7 million tonnes of packaging waste, of which around 65 % (Source NPWD) was recovered.  This is a significant achievement when compared to the fact that only 27% of packaging waste was recovered in 1998 (Source publication: e-Digest of Environmental Statistics, March 2006). However, more still needs to be done and Defra will continue working to:

  • minimise the amount of packaging used and so the amount of packaging waste, and
  • ensure that a high proportion of packaging materials are recovered and recycled

The management of packaging and packaging waste is enforced by EC directive 2004/12/EC which seeks to reduce the impact of packaging and packaging waste on the environment by introducing recovery and recycling targets for packaging waste and by encouraging minimisation and reuse.

Loughborough University subscribes to several  online journals which cover packaging and the environemt,  such as  Packaging Magazine,    Paperboard Packaging,   Journal of Material Cycles and Waste Management and Waste News etc,  which can be accessed via MetaLib.  [Athens username and password required for off campus access.]. 

The University Library also has a comprehensive collection of books on packaging design, graphic design and  aesthetics of packaging, innovation, sustainability,  structure  and environmental issues.

If you would like to learn more about UK packaging and waste mangement, please see the links below.

 Packaging & Packaging Waste – recycling and recovery targets

EU directive 2004/12/EC

 WRAP

The Advisory Committee on Packaging (ACP)

Department of Design and Technology, Loughborough University

 


Sea of Tranquillity

July 21, 2009

 

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 Apollo 40th Anniversary

 

 ‘Apollo 11 makes its thunderous, fiery exit at tea time on July 16th with its three man crew: Mr. Neil Armstrong, a civilian who is destined to be the first on the moon, Lieutenant-Colonel Edwin Aldrin, who will walk the surface with him, and Lieutenant-Colonel Michael Collins who will stay in the orbiting command module………Perhaps the greatest prize awaited from the journey is the 50lb. of lunar rock and soil the astronauts are expected to gather ……… ‘The Times Tuesday, Jun 03, 1969; pg. III; Issue 57576; col A

The lunar rock samples brought by the Apollo missions show us that the moon contains familiar material such as iron, aluminium, potassium, magnesium, feldspar, basalt, ranging in form from fine dust to rugged rocks and boulders.  

Samples were distributed to a selection of  scientific institutions throughout the world,  and lunar rock samples went on public display at the Museum and Institute of Geological Sciences, London, in September 1969 [Edinburgh University’s sample is said to have ‘arrived in a tiny phial wrapped in a pair of pyjamas …. Five grams of  greyish brown dust … estimated to be worth more than £1m.’   The Times Saturday, Sep 20, 1969; pg. 1; Issue 57670; col A]

Loughborough University subscribes to over 40 aeronautical and astronolical journals online, such as Acta astronauticaAstronomy & geophysicsAstrophysics and Space Science  and Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy , all of which can be accessed via MetaLib.   [ATHENS username and password required for off campus access]

Image collections are available also in MetaLib, giving a wide range of pictures of the moon, footage from  NASA space missions, interviews with former astronauts, audio tracks of the moon landings, – for audio visual material you can use  Newsfilm online  [ some 3,000 hours of footage; c. 60,000 stories] and  BBC Motion Gallery [which contains over 30,000 clips are available, spanning 70 years].   [ATHENS username and password required for access].

If you would like to learn more about the Apollo missions, please see the links below.

Google Moon

Film of Apollo 11

Audio Apollo 11 landing

NASA – Celebrating the ‘giant leap’

Department of Aeronautical and Automotive Engineering at Loughborough University.

Department of Geography at Loughborough University


The E-Reference Library

July 14, 2009
Part of my library. Copyright: Hamzeh Karbasi www.flickr.com
Part of my library. Copyright: Hamzeh Karbasi http://www.flickr.com

There is a lot of debate currently about the respective merits of books in hard copy and electronic format but what cannot be questioned is the value of the electronic reference book. From your desktop you can now access the equivalent of  several shelves of reference works like the ones depicted in the photograph.  If you need to check the spelling of a word, you can consult the Oxford English Dictionary and find that you’ll be tempted to browse for a while to check how your word’s meaning has changed through time. If it is biographical information you are searching for, the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography will provide the answer if  you need to find out about  a deceased British subject or a person who has influenced British history. Among the subject specific works you will discover many social science and humanities titles.  The Sage collection includes the encyclopedias of children, adolescents and the media; social science research methods and even murder.  Among the Oxford Digital Reference titles are works on decorative and performance arts, British and American literature; linguistics and economic history. Take a look at the Library’s e-Books webpage and find out exactly how many reference works are available to you.


Cricket at Loughborough

July 7, 2009

 

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‘On Wednesday an interesting game was played in Mr Tyler’s meadow, near the railway, between eleven of the Loughborough’s Gentlemen’s Club, and the Borough-hill Club.   At the close of the game, which was played first-rate, the number of runs stood as follows:  Loughborough 192, Borough Hill 92, majority, 100.‘  The Era (London, England), Sunday, August 13, 1843; Issue 255

Loughborough has a long cricket history.  Tyler’s meadow is believed to be a ground  near Allsops Lane, where Loughborough played an annual match against the All England Eleven and the United England Eleven from 1856 – 1871.

Loughborough has had, over time, up to 12 cricket grounds, such as the Park Road ground which was first used in 1913, and the College Ground, where Leicestershire came to play Galmorgan in 1929.  The first ever County Cricket match between Leicester and Nottingham was played in Loughborough in 1781, although the location of this early pitch is unknown.

Loughborough University Library has over 200 books on cricket, ranging from historic works such as W.G. Grace’s Cricket, published in 1891 and housed in the Special Collections alongside books on cricket by Douglas Jardine, C.B. Fry, Walter Hammond, Pelham Warner, Neville Cardus and Donald Bradman,  to modern coaching and training manuals.

You can also  find out more about cricket via sports databases available on through MetaLib, such as SPORTDiscus which can be searched for full-text articles on physical fitness, exercise, sports medicine, sports science, physical education, kinesiology, coaching, training etc.

If you would like to find out more about modern cricket at Loughborough, please see the links below.

Loughborough UCCE (University Cricket Centre of Excellence)

National Cricket Performance Centre

Loughborough School of Sport and Exercise Sciences

Loughborough School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Loughborough Outwoods Cricket Club

Loughborough Greenfields Cricket Club 

Loughborough Carillon Cricket Club

Loughborough Town Cricket Club