Comic Relief

Comic Relief

Today is Comic Relief day!

Comic Relief describes its mission as bringing about ‘positive change through the power of entertainment’. It was established in 1985, and since then has helped tackle poverty and social injustice at home and abroad by

  • Inspiring people across the country to join in with fundraising.
  • Raising more than £425 million since 1985.
  • Making over 6000 grants in the UK.
  • Making over 1700 grants internationally.

The money raised is allocated to a wide range of grants and social investments aimed at delivering real and long-lasting change to the poorest, most vulnerable people at home and across the world; as well as informing the public and young people in particular about global citizenship and the underlying causes of extreme poverty.

That money comes in from a number of different sources. Traditional charitable fundraising obviously plays a vital role. The public contribute to Comic Relief’s annual campaigns by raising money through sponsorship and by making donations online, by post, by telephone and through major banks and building societies. This support, from almost the very day Comic Relief was formed, has been both humbling and inspirational.

On the business side of things, Comic Relief works with key corporate partners to produce products and promotions that are profitable. The clearest example of this is the Red Nose that is the emblem of Red Nose Day. In 2005 over £5 million was raised from the sale of noses.

Where possible these products tie-in with the charity’s commitment to delivering benefits to poor farmers and producers. The Red Nose Day 2007 T-shirt for instance was made with fair trade cotton from Mali, Cameroon and Senegal and there will be a fair trade Maraba Bourbon coffee grown in Rwanda, a country to which Comic Relief has had a clear commitment since the appalling genocide of 1994.

Another way Comic Relief raises funds is via the creativity made available to the charity. Comedians from time to time offer access to key brands like Little Britain for commercial exploitation. The charity also develops and owns key sub-brands like Robbie the Reindeer and Monkey, both of which deliver a revenue too.

Why not find out more from:

  • Comic Relief
  • Mintel marketing reports on who are the major players in the charity sector
  • FAME for company data including financial details
  • Nexis UK for newspaper articles on giving to charity
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